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Reebok payouts for UFC 224: Amanda Nunes breaks sponsorship bank

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MMA: UFC 224- Nunes vs Pennington Jason Silva-USA TODAY Sports

Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) returned to the hurt business last Saturday night (May 12, 2018) for UFC 224, which took place inside Jeunesse Arena in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and now it’s time to see who walked away with the biggest piece of the Reebok sponsorship pie.

Event headliner and current women’s Bantamweight champion Amanda Nunes went home with the biggest sponsorship check from Reebok after defeating Raquel Pennington in the main event title fight (see it again here).

For her troubles, “Rocky” grabbed a $30,000 sponsorship check, while longtime veterans Lyoto Machida and Vitor Belfort claimed $20,000 each for their Middleweight scrap (full recap here).

But that’s not all, so let’s take a look at the rest of the Reebok payouts courtesy of MMA Junkie.

Amanda Nunes: $40,000 def. Raquel Pennington: $30,000

Kelvin Gastelum: $10,000 def. Ronaldo Souza: $10,000

Mackenzie Dern: $3,500 def. Amanda Cooper: $5,000

John Lineker: $10,000 def. Brian Kelleher: $5,000

Lyoto Machida: $20,000 def. Vitor Belfort: $20,000

Cezar Ferreira: $10,000 def. Karl Roberson: $3,500

Aleksei Oleinik: $5,000 def. Junior Albini: $3,500

Davi Ramos: $3,500 def. Nick Hein: $5,000

Elizeu Zaleski dos Santos: $5,000 def. Sean Strickland: $5,000

Warlley Alves: $5,000 def. Sultan Aliev: $3,500

Jack Hermansson: $5,000 def. Thales Leites: $15,000

Ramazan Emeev: $3,500 def. Alberto Mina: $5,000

Markus Perez: $3,500 def. James Bochnovic: $3,500

TOTAL: $239,500

According to the payout structure (see it), the more fights you have combined with UFC and the now-defunct World Extreme Cagefighting (WEC) and Strikeforce promotions, the more coin you have for your combat sports piggy bank.

And the less fights you have under the ZUFFA banner... well, the less you get. If you have a problem with the structure, take it up with UFC, not Reebok.

According to the report, fighters will also receive royalty and payments up to 20-30 percent of any UFC-related merchandise sold that bears his or her likeness. That’s a great way for the Internet “morons” to help the cause.