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NSAC overhauls drug testing policy, implements multiyear suspensions for steroid users

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Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports

Consider the hammer dropped.

Nevada State Athletic Commission (NSAC) today (Fri., May 15, 2015) announced a new-and-improved drug testing policy, one that is designed to deter -- and severely punish -- those combat sports fighters who test positive for performance enhancing drugs (PEDs).

Like this guy.

ESPN tweeted a memo of the new guidelines, helpfully transcribed by MMA Junkie:

Steroids:

Three years and 50-70 percent of purse for first offense
Four years and 75-100 percent of purse for second offense
Lifetime ban and 100 percent of purse for third offense

Stimulants:

Two years and 35-45 percent of purse for first offense
Three years and 50-60 percent of purse for second offense
Lifetime ban and 100 percent of purse for third offense

Diuretics:

One year and 30-40 percent of purse for first offense
Two years and 40-50 percent of purse for second offense
Lifetime ban and 100 percent of purse for third offense

Sedatives, muscle relaxants, sleep aids, anxiolytics, opiates and cannabis/marijuana:

18 months and 30-40 percent of purse for first offense
Two years and 40-50 percent of purse for second offense
Three years and 60-75 percent of purse for third offense
Lifetime ban and 100 percent of purse for four offense

The policy takes effect Sept. 1, so hurry up and get your 'roids on before it's too late!

In addition, a fighter who tests positive will have his or her win overturned to a loss, as opposed to a No Contest, which sounds like overkill when you start doling out lifetime bans, but I guess you can consider this the commission's "shock and awe" campaign.

Could not have come at a better time.

Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) also promised to revamp its own drug testing policies in the wake of several test failures to kick off the new year. Aside from Anderson Silva (steroids) and Nick Diaz (marijuana), Hector Lombard was also grinding the gear.

Then there was this little mess.

Each case will be decided on its own merits, so the figures above should not be considered mandatory punishments. Still, the option is there if and when NSAC wants to make an example out of someone, something it has a history of doing in MMA.

Just ask this guy.