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UFC Fight Night 62: Josh Koscheck fighting for his legacy against Erick Silva in Brazil

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Which is why the former No. 1 contender will fight his ass off to avoid a fifth straight loss.

Stephen R. Sylvanie-USA TODAY Sports

Josh Koscheck, a one-time Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) welterweight title contender, is now at the lowest point of his mixed martial arts (MMA) career.

At least that's what he said during his conversation with UFC.com ahead of his bout against Erick Silva, which goes down later tonight (March 21, 2015) at UFC Fight Night 62 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. That's because his loss to Jake Ellenberger last month at UFC 184 was his fourth straight.

Video replay here.

Which is why "Kos" plans to put it all on the line against the rising contender, and he won't shy away from taking chances against a very dangerous striker. Because despite being at a low point in his career, it's now about fighting for his legacy.

"I don't mind pressure. This is definitely at the lowest point of my career as far as winning and losing is concerned. With that being said, my legacy is on the line in this fight and I have to go in there and fight my ass off. I have to put it all out there and I can't be afraid to take chances. That's what I'm going to do in this fight. I plan on taking some chances and putting some hands on this guy. I want to let everyone see the progress of Josh Koscheck over the last 10 years. I'm coming to fight."

The quick-turnaround was a welcome one for Koscheck, who stepped up on a few weeks' notice after Ben Saunders was forced out of the Silva fight with an injury. And with only eight days of training under his belt, Josh is confident it's more than enough to get the job done in Rio.

A fight against Silva, however, is far from a walk in the park. Still, Koscheck is adamant that the young Brazilian won't throw anything his way he hasn't already seen in his decade of fighting.

As Josh sees it, 'He's going to come out hard in the first round, slow down in the second, and die out in the third.'

Sound familiar?