clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile

Filed under:

Head trauma forces ex-UFC heavyweight champ Tim Sylvia to retire

Ed Mulholland-USA TODAY Sports

Some of you young bucks may not be old enough to remember what Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) was like when Tim Sylvia was king of the heavyweight castle, but there was a point from 2005-06 when "The Maine-iac" won six straight, including two over then-fanboy darling Andrei Arlovski.

Sigh ... good times.

In fact, his bout against Randy Couture is what prompted me to spout off at the mouth for the very first time right here on MMAmania.com, as I predicted a swift and certain death for "The Natural" roughly eight years ago prior to the UFC 68 pay-per-view (PPV) main event.

Hence, Nostradumbass was born.

Sylvia would go on to lose the Couture fight, part of a dreadful 1-4 run which included an embarrassing knockout loss to pudgy pugilist Ray Mercer in 2009 (video). He was able to rebound on the regional circuit with a 7-1 stretch, but things took a turn for the worse in 2012 and "The Maine-iac" dropped three straight.

And that's how it ends, as Sylvia called it quits over the weekend after an MRI booted him from a scheduled contest at Mohegan Sun (more on that here).

Manager Monte Cox talks to ESPN:

"There were some things on the MRI that weren't on another MRI we had on file from 2003, meaning something happened over the course of the last 11 years. A neurologist said it could be something or it could be nothing. He can go back and get another MRI in a year, but basically what they're saying is there's damage from blunt force trauma. He's got damage there. Does it affect his everyday life? Not so far. Not that he can tell -- but it's certainly something to pay attention to."

Weighing 371 pounds is something to pay attention to, as well.

Sylvia recently campaigned for one last shot at UFC superstardom, but was given the cold shoulder by UFC President Dana White, who blocked "The Maine-iac" on Twitter after fans bombed him with #Rally4Timmy tweets. Hopefully this retirement sticks and he doesn't turn up in Japan next year looking for a payday.

Then again, there's always this.